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SXSW Interactive 2013

What Does Your Health Data Tell The World?

Mobile devices and smart phones begin to help us monitor our exercise, calorie intake, and the number of steps that we take, science fiction is becoming reality. This year, smartphones will outsell feature phones and the public is taking to their small-screen devices as a content consumption platform in and out of the home. These devices are increasingly becoming how we manage our professional, personal lives. These devices, when combined with health specific monitoring devices like the Jabba Up and FitBit extend the information being captured with sleep and motion statistics.

And what about all of this data? Where does it go? How is it accessed and by who? These are some of the big questions to ask when we capture the data. How do we provide transparency to physicians to certain types of data and not others?

These are some of the larger healthcare issues that need to be addressed. What about the moral responsibilities in genetically transmittable conditions? Do individuals

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Takeaways

  1. How is technology helping the public live longer and healthier lives through technology and monitoring?
  2. Is the accumulation of health data a benefit to society and what is the impact on privacy?
  3. How can physicians and healthcare professionals leverage personal and regional data to provide better healthcare?
  4. What does the future hold for personal technology in personal healthcare?
  5. Does technology and data have a benefit to reduce patient morbidity?

Speakers

Organizer

chris cullmann, VP, Digital Strategy, Ogilvy CommonHealth

Meta Information:

  • Tags: data, social
  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Dual
  • Track: Health and Medicine
  • Level: Intermediate
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