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SXSW Interactive 2013

Changing the Conversation, Not Just the Ratio

Everyone wants to know: where are all the women in tech? It’s not unusual at technology conferences (like this one) for men to take the stage and audiences to walk away shaking their heads at the lack of female representation in the tech world. Movements have been created out of this visible gender gap - Rachel Sklar’s “Change the Ratio” initiative comes to mind.
But here’s the thing: if you work at a tech company, take a look around. Chances are, there is a woman sitting not too far away from you. And while it may be the case that many women are found working on non-“technical” teams – Marketing, PR, Sales, who’s to say these roles are not as critical (if not more) to a startup’s success as, say, a developer’s?
There is a greater underlying issue here, and not one of gender, but of the understated perception of the value of these roles; because as difficult as it is to code, it takes equal skill to fulfill a sales or admin role effectively - it’s time we changed the conversation.

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Takeaways

  1. What my experience, as a woman working in technology, has been.
  2. Whether or not there are actually too few women in tech?
  3. Why it is that certain roles have historically deemed as being more valuable than others in the technology sector?
  4. What needs to be done industry wide to pay respect to those "other" teams?
  5. What Joe Stump, (and a special guest), have to say about their organizations and the impact certain roles have played in their successes.

Speakers

  • Aubrey Sabala, VP of Marketing & Communications, Sailthru
  • Joe Stump, CEO & Founder, Sprint.ly

Organizer

Aubrey Sabala, VP of Marketing & Communications, Sailthru

Meta Information:

  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Panel
  • Track: Work and Career
  • Level: Intermediate
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