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SXSW Interactive 2015

Neuroplasticity & Tech - Why Brands Have to Change

In the 50s Bill Bernbach claimed that we as communicators must focus on the ‘unchanging man’. However, even the King of Madison Avenue could not have predicted the nature and pace of change heralded by the age of technology.

Working with neuroscience experts from around the world, we will debate the critical challenge we face as marketers in the digital age – whether technology empowers existing behaviours in new ways or is actually causing behaviour to evolve.

We will explore the concept of 'neuroplasticity' and how many believe the paradigm shifts of the web, social media and mobile are fundamentally altering the way we think, behave and connect as consumers and human beings. Our dependence on technology has already been shown to affect our memories, our visual skills, our creativity and even our dreams. As it continues to pervade our lives, we will discuss the evolving relationship between people and technology, and the ways brands can ensure they play a positive role in it.

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Takeaways

  1. Are the paradigm shifts of the web, social media and mobile so significant that they are challenging the sense of ‘unchanging man’?
  2. What is neuroplasticity, and how is our behaviour affected by it?
  3. Does technology empower existing behaviours in new ways, or is it fundamentally causing our behaviour to evolve due to ‘neuroplasticity’?
  4. What impacts is technology having on the wiring of our brain, and how is this affecting our behaviours?
  5. How can marketers prepare themselves for the age of technology where people think and behave in dramatically different ways?

Speakers

Organizer

Felix Morgan, Innovator, HeyHuman

Meta Information:

  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Dual
  • Track: Branding and Marketing
  • Level: Advanced
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