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SXSW Interactive 2013

Sexy Things: How to See, Touch or Talk to Them

In our increasingly connected and mobile world, a plethora of new technologies allow for interacting with everyday objects through mobile devices. In this panel, we’ll look at these different ways for interacting with everyday objects, starting from image recogntion (such as barcode, receipt or credit card scanning) to radio-based technologies (such as NFC/RFID) to voice recognition.We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of these technologies and how they are suited to enabling different use cases and business models (in m-marketing, m-commerce, m-payment and even arts). Finally, we will explore how this natural gateway to an emerging Web of Things changes our relationship with the world around us.
Panel speakers (to be confirmed):
- Vlad Coroma: Co-founder EVRYTHNG
- Benjamin Wiederkehr, Co-founder Interactive Things
- Till Bay, Co-founder Kooaba,
- Tom Gruber, Co-founder Siri (acquired by Apple)
- Samuel Mueller, Co-founder and CEO Scandit

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Takeaways

  1. Mobile image recognition, NFC or voice interaction – what are their strengths and weaknesses?
  2. Ok, I’ve just identified an object through my mobile phone. Fine, what do it do now and where do I get the data for the object from?
  3. Use cases and object interaction: Which technology fits which purpose?
  4. Workhorse vs. Showman: What does really work and what creates just a lot of buzz?
  5. What are the mid-term implications of object interaction, who earns money from this and what happens with all the generated data?

Speakers

  • Samuel Mueller, CEO and co-founder, Scandit

Organizer

Samuel Mueller, CEO & co-founder, Scandit

Meta Information:

  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Panel
  • Track: DIY, Hacker and Maker
  • Level: Intermediate
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