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SXSW Interactive 2014

Social Media — A Right Brain Renaissance

The Internet is changing the way we use our brains. On par with the advent of language, Internet use represents a major shift in the way we use our gray matter. Our time online involves not just language, but visual and audio cues across countless complex spatial relationships. And it’s a colossal change. The non-linear, highly contextualized way content is digested online, moves markedly away from its hugely linear predecessor, the printed page.

What’s more, the right brain kicks into high gear when presented with novelty. With its constantly emerging nature, the Internet is nothing if not constantly novel, giving us one kick-ass right brain workout every time we log on.

Put a layer of social media on top of that and what you’ve got is real-time access to a right brain renaissance. Your social customers are a new breed of human—intuitive, creative, collaborative and fast. With social networking tools, platforms and apps, you have access to all of them.

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Takeaways

  1. Why social media is not just another channel.
  2. How social customers are different than any customers that have come before.
  3. What social customers are capable of, and how they can drive real change in your business.
  4. How to engage and enlist social customers to act on your behalf.
  5. How interactive marketers, customer care and community management professionals must reinvent their roles and drive internal business change in order to take advantage of the full potential of social media.

Speakers

  • Bonnie Thomas, Director, Content Strategy, Lithium

Organizer

Bonnie Thomas, Director, Content Strategy, Lithium

Meta Information:

  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Solo
  • Track: Social and Relationships
  • Track 2
  • Level: Intermediate
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