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SXSW Interactive 2014

Protests in Brazil: When Social Media Gets Real

In June 2013 more than a million people took to the streets of Brazil in a social media fueled protest for social change.
Social media's influence in instigating global events is not news, and analysis on why social media is so effective is well known. The decentralization of power, giving individuals the opportunity to be heard and have an active role in the story, has been shown in recent events.
What made this protest so different was the call of the people to work with the existing government for change; not a call for a change in government leadership. There were no politics, no parties, just people socializing for change witch is the biggest indicative of how social media have changed inter-personal relationships and this time It´s not just about the format or the platform but also the storytelling.
This session aims to take this one step further by exploring the evolution of online conversations to “social conversations” a nonlinear, but effective way to communicate

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Takeaways

  1. How has online conversation changed from the way we communicated in the past and how is it changing the way we are conversing today?
  2. Individuals or groups? Who should we talk to, who should we listen to?
  3. What did we learn from the reaction of the Brazilian government?
  4. What did we learn from the reaction of the police, the media and even FIFA?
  5. What do brands need to learn and put into action as a result of this evolution of communication?

Speakers

Organizer

Douglas Rodrigues, Head of Planning, The Group Communications Worldwide

Meta Information:

  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Solo
  • Track: Social and Relationships
  • Level: Beginning
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