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SXSW Interactive 2014

Marketing Backwards: A New Era

As a business owner or marketer, you’re pressured to use social media even at the expense of other tools. Social media is said to be more effective than advertising, websites, press releases, and trade shows. Is it? To add to that idea, you’re told social media is about being human, but what does “being human” mean? Some people use social media as a means of personal fulfillment. It feeds their ego. They don’t want branded messages or great deals; they desire friendship or approbation. Many people, though, increasingly use automated tools to represent themselves, their clients, or their businesses online. Conversations are replaced with a robotic blasting of blog posts and company information. Join Margie Clayman and Erin Feldman of Marketing Backwards, along with their sidekick Puffin, a robot bear, as they address these concerns and examine how warmth, creativity, and old-fashioned customer care are needed in this new era of marketing.

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Takeaways

  1. Why are people increasingly turning to social media as a way to build ego and gain a sense of fulfillment?
  2. If people use social media for acutely personal reasons, how can brands break into that space?
  3. Although brands need to break through in a more personal online setting, are they or are they catering more to a world of robot-like automation?
  4. Is the pressure to produce content that reaches people so immense that companies focus on social media and content marketing to the exclusion of all other marketing tactics?
  5. In this increasingly automated and noisy land, does creativity and high-quality marketing still matter?

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Organizer

Erin Feldman, Writer and Editor, Write Right

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