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SXSW Interactive 2014

Unlocking Inspiration for Visual Storytelling

More and more, we communicate visually. Every day, people share hundreds of millions of images through Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat. As Nick Bilton of the NY Times put it, “Photos, once slices of a moment in the past — sunsets, meetings with friends, the family vacation — are fast becoming an entirely new type of dialogue.”

Since Haiku Deck (a visual presentation builder) launched, we have served up millions of images and analyzed what people are searching for, and which images they’re choosing to illustrate those concepts. Our recent partnership with Getty Images deepened our understanding of how people communicate meaning through images.

In this collaborative session, we’ll do a deep dive on the data to investigate what stories people are telling and which images they’re choosing. We’ll then explore techniques and strategies for pushing visual storytelling further, going beyond the literal and the expected to unlock deeper meaning and more powerful visual communication.

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Takeaways

  1. Why is visual communication so powerful?
  2. What are the most common concepts that people want to illustrate?
  3. What do their choices tell us about their thought process?
  4. What are some strategies for making visual communication more effective?
  5. How can we use these insights to develop better apps and products?

Speakers

  • Catherine Carr, VP of Marketing/Chief Inspiration Officer, Haiku Deck
  • Andrew Delaney, Director of Content Development, Creative, Getty Images

Organizer

Catherine Carr, VP of Marketing/Chief Inspiration Officer, Haiku Deck

Meta Information:

  • Tags: storytelling
  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Dual
  • Track: Art and Inspiration
  • Level: Intermediate
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