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SXSW Interactive 2013

Post-Search Life:Smartphones Anticipate Every Need

With half of Americans carrying smartphones, traditional Internet search is making way for services that know our wants and needs before we do. A new breed of smartphone apps is helping solve our problems without any initiative on our part.

Consider this scenario: you're in London for business, with only a few hours free. Your phone knows you’re a visitor, and that you like museums and galleries back home. It becomes a virtual concierge, proposing art destinations and plotting logistics automatically. When you linger too long, it proposes a new dinner reservation at a restaurant nearby, since a traffic jam will make it impossible to keep your original plans. Knowing your dating preferences, your phone introduces you to a potential match close by, with suggestions for a dessert date.

Perhaps the most important new wave in consumer technology, anticipatory services are not only improving our efficiency, but also helping us live more fulfilling lives.

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Takeaways

  1. What anticipatory services are already in market?
  2. How far can these services go in changing our lives?
  3. How will these push-based anticipatory searches co-exist with traditional pull-based search?
  4. Are there risks with apps and services heading in this direction?
  5. What is the future of these services as they continue to develop and evolve?

Speakers

  • Alex Harrington, CEO, MeetMoi, LLC
  • Babak Pahlavan, Director of Product Management, Google, Inc.
  • Dave Grannan, Vice President of Direct-to-Consumer, Nuance
  • Josh Rochlin, CEO, Xtify

Organizer

Alex Harrington, CEO, MeetMoi, LLC

Meta Information:

  • Tags: mobile, social media
  • Event: Interactive
  • Format: Panel
  • Track: Social and Relationships
  • Level: Intermediate
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