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Choosing a CMS for Your Non-Profit

If you've ever had to select a content management system for your non-profit's website, you know that the process is fraught with questions. A big player in your industry went with Drupal - does that make it right for you? (Maybe). You've heard great things about eZ Publish - is it worth the ramp-up cost? (Possibly). Should you write your own CMS in-house? (Almost definitely not). What about integration with external tools? Fundraising? AMS? Etc.?

Join us as we talk about these and other issues facing non-profit decision makers as they navigate the often-confusing world of CMS choices. This is a core conversation where you'll get a chance to ask questions, share insights, and even learn something. Led by 2 industry leaders from Beaconfire, a consulting firm that has implemented more than a dozen CMS solutions exclusively for non-profits, this conversation will leave you armed and ready the next time you face this decision...which may be sooner than you think.

Additional Supporting Materials

Questions

  1. What are the core criteria I need to consider when choosing a Content Management System for my non-profit organization, and which criteria are unique to non-profits?
  2. What are some of the big players in the CMS space and what differentiates them from each other? What are the pros & cons of open-source vs. closed-source products?
  3. How can I protect myself when my vendor or chosen product disappears from the marketplace?
  4. Should I go with an outside agency, a contractor, or hire up in-house? When looking at outside agencies, what's more important - a good partner or a good product?
  5. What kind of timeframe should I expect for a CMS selection process, and what are the steps involved? Can I rush it?

Speakers

Organizer

Jordan Hirsch, Senior Technical Lead, Beaconfire


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